Book Review : The Appeal

I am finally back with another book review and this, unfortunately, will not be pretty; not because the book is not nice, but simply because I found out what the genre I least like actually is.

This book was gifted to me by my friend’s mother, since she had it laying around and never read it. It was not in its best condition, but I never turn my back on any book. I finally got to read it a month ago and it took me much longer than with any other book, mainly because of the lack of action throughout.

The plot consists in a web of legal (or should I say “illegal”) relationships between business magnates, judges, lawyers, and private organisations. The whole ordeal starts four years prior to the beginning of the book, when Krane Chemical, a pharmaceutical company that had a factory in the fictional Cary County (later nicknamed “Cancer County”), got accused of creating more toxic waste than what it declared and burying it underground, illegally. This action contaminated the water of the county and led to many cases of cancer, 15 times superior than in any other USA county.

The lawyers which accused the company on behalf of a woman who lost both her husband and son, won the case and got $41 million in damages. Of course, had it been this simple the book would have ended within 20 pages. The defence attorneys then brought the case to the Supreme Court and this is where the whole mess gets created. Part-owner of Krane Chemical, Carl Trudeau decides to contact an organisation that puts certain individuals on the Supreme Court, by removing others which would have sided with the underdog. The narration gets frustrating at times because it deals with important social issues such as homosexual marriage and civil liability, issues that get dismissed or refused by the chosen candidate, an oh-so-perfect Christian with a perfect family whose only hobby is reading the Bible and misinterpreting it. It gets frustrating seeing how many people can suffer from ignorance and this book is a portrait of what happens today in the world. Having been written in 2008, the law making same-sex marriage legal had not been emanated yet, so it is sickening to read of how homosexuals were treated in southern states.

The whole book is full of technical terms, but it is not too difficult to read. The one thing that upset me the most was the lack of action. The most action-filled scene is the one at the beginning, where the good lawyers win the case, but that is about it. There is also very little dialogue and the time of the book seems stale, even if it narrates a whole year.

On a good note, it did open my eyes on corruption and bribery, but had I wanted that I would have read an essay.

Score : 4.5/10

Thank you for reading.

 

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